At this stage, those who have been on the job hunt for more than a few weeks are well aware of some of the major career advice given to help aid their employment search.

However, while much of this advice can be critical in helping you find your life purpose, it is absolutely critical to be able to decipher which information is still relevant these days, as much of it has been passed down for years.

Perhaps the most obvious example is the fact that it is no longer essential for employment seekers to conduct telephone interviews with a landline. This piece of advice was clearly popular when cell phones were first arriving on the scene, but these days, many people don't even have landlines, so the strategy cannot apply in some cases.

Additionally, while it may seem helpful to provide every piece of employment history and experience to your prospective employer, this can be extremely time consuming.

Alison Green, an author and career blogger, told U.S. News & World Report that every bit of experience does not need to be included on the resume because the document is designed to portray you in the best light possible and make your case as a strong candidate. As such, it is important to keep in mind what the employer is looking for and what strengths you bring to the table that can help the company succeed down the road.

Life purpose planning may seem like an overwhelming task, but by listening to sound advice that still translates into today's working world, you can put yourself in position to overcome the national unemployment rate, which increased to 9.2 percent in June, according to the recent Labor Department report.